aspire s5 ultrabook Intel making an effort to boost Ultrabooks popularity

Tablets are digging into sales of laptops, and Intel doesn’t want the laptop breed to die totally.  The growing popularity of the iPad is just one of the problem laptop manufacturers have to deal with.  Intuitive touchscreens, slim, ultra-portable, and just plain fun to play with are just some of the aspects that make tablets more desirable than a laptop.  Intel started a $300 million fund last year to help small companies develop ultrabooks, which Intel hope would lead to an ultrabook revolution that might help make ultraportable laptops as popular as iPads/tablets.

aspire s5 ultrabook Intel making an effort to boost Ultrabooks popularity

Tablets are digging into sales of laptops, and Intel doesn’t want the laptop breed to die totally.  The growing popularity of the iPad is just one of the problem laptop manufacturers have to deal with.  Intuitive touchscreens, slim, ultra-portable, and just plain fun to play with are just some of the aspects that make tablets more desirable than a laptop.  Intel started a $300 million fund last year to help small companies develop ultrabooks, which Intel hope would lead to an ultrabook revolution that might help make ultraportable laptops as popular as iPads/tablets. 

new ipad Intel making an effort to boost Ultrabooks popularity

The problem with trying to ultrabooks competitive with tablets is not so much its function, but rather its price. Current quality ultrabook such as the Asus Zenbook UX31 costs about $1,000, and an iPad retail price starts at $499.

Intel claims that if manufacturers adopt “aerospace” engineering method, that, it will cut down the production costs of ultrabooks.  Through various components rearrangement within the ultrabook’s casing, Intel asserts that it will make ultrabooks with plastic casing be just as durable as the ones with metal casings. 

"We didn't develop a new material. We are able to use an existing plastic with an existing manufacturing technology.  It just requires some more upfront thought initially about how to lay your system out and how you can bring these things together and tie them in," Intel’s Chief Executive Paul Otellini told Reuters. 

small Intel 3rd Gen Core Mobile Intel making an effort to boost Ultrabooks popularity

Why is a chip maker (no, the chips you’re eating right now) putting so much effort into helping manufacturers with their engineering development?  It would seem like Intel doesn’t want to lower the prices of their chip to make ultrabooks cheaper.  Current Intel CPUs are priced around $200—one of the costliest component in a PC, if not the most.

Advanced Micro Devices’ (AMD) Trinity CPU is a cheaper option to Intel’s CPU, and that’s another front that Intel has to battle.  Even with the competitor’s price lower, Intel seems adamant about not lowering the price of their “premium” CPUs. 

At the upcoming Computex event in Taipei, Taiwan, PC manufacturers that have been working with Intel will reveal some ultrabooks that have less flex-plastic casings, faster boot time, and touchscreens.  Intel’s effort to boost ultrabook’s popularity through price reduction may or may not end up in vain, but heck, I would rather buy a sturdy ultrabook with a built in keyboard and touchscreen any day—for $499, that is.  We can all dream, right?

Source: reuters.com