Intel and Microsoft are combining their industry power in an attempt to make the HD DVD format the victor in a battle over a standard to succeed DVD. There are several reasons the two companies went with HD DVD, said Richard Doherty, Microsoft’s program manager for media entertainment convergence. Among them: HD DVD requires that movies be copied to a consumer’s hard drive, making it easier for people to send movies around home networks; the format supports regular DVD recordings on the flip side of the disc, letting people sell hybrid discs to consumers who have DVD players today but fear their discs will be obsolete; and the format offers more capacity.

Intel and Microsoft are combining their industry power in an attempt to make the HD DVD format the victor in a battle over a standard to succeed DVD. There are several reasons the two companies went with HD DVD, said Richard Doherty, Microsoft’s program manager for media entertainment convergence. Among them: HD DVD requires that movies be copied to a consumer’s hard drive, making it easier for people to send movies around home networks; the format supports regular DVD recordings on the flip side of the disc, letting people sell hybrid discs to consumers who have DVD players today but fear their discs will be obsolete; and the format offers more capacity.