Intel has disclosed some details of its next-generation communications
processor, code-named Hermon, which is targeted at single- and dual-mode
wideband CDMA phones. The single-chip device incorporates an XScale MSA
architecture processor, on-chip StrataFlash memory, and W-CDMA and GPRS baseband
logic on an integrated circuit designed to be made with a 0.13-micron
manufacturing process. Intel plans to announce full details of the product
within six months, and expects both mass-market cellphones and smartphones based
on the chip to appear in 2005. Reference designs based on Hermon are expected by
the end of the 2004. The fully scalable system-on-chip device incorporates a
number of key mobile technologies, such as Quick Capture and Clear Connect
solutions, which will allow handsets to track multiple basestations, thus
leading to fewer dropped calls, yet draws on the existing XScale communications
processor.

Intel also demonstrated a prototype that supports three wireless radios in
the same device — Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GSM/GPRS, a cell phone standard. Such
designs can be used by phone manufacturers to design new products. t will run on
the latest version of the Bulverde applications processor, wireless MMX and an
XScale communications processor. The phone chip supports leading operating
systems, including Microsoft, Symbian, Linux, Java and PalmOS. The reference
design will also play MP3 music files with PC-quality sound, and incorporates a
1.3-megapixel digital camera. Eventually, Intel plans to further reduce the size
of the individual components by integrating more features into fewer chips.
Instead of separate radios for each service, software will be able to tune a
single device to whatever frequency is needed.

Intel has disclosed some details of its next-generation communications
processor, code-named Hermon, which is targeted at single- and dual-mode
wideband CDMA phones. The single-chip device incorporates an XScale MSA
architecture processor, on-chip StrataFlash memory, and W-CDMA and GPRS baseband
logic on an integrated circuit designed to be made with a 0.13-micron
manufacturing process. Intel plans to announce full details of the product
within six months, and expects both mass-market cellphones and smartphones based
on the chip to appear in 2005. Reference designs based on Hermon are expected by
the end of the 2004. The fully scalable system-on-chip device incorporates a
number of key mobile technologies, such as Quick Capture and Clear Connect
solutions, which will allow handsets to track multiple basestations, thus
leading to fewer dropped calls, yet draws on our existing XScale communications
processor.

Intel also demonstrated a prototype that supports three wireless radios in
the same device — Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GSM/GPRS, a cell phone standard. Such
designs can be used by phone manufacturers to design new products. It will run on
the latest version of the Bulverde applications processor, wireless MMX and an
XScale communications processor. The phone chip supports leading operating
systems, including Microsoft, Symbian, Linux, Java and PalmOS. The reference
design will also play MP3 music files with PC-quality sound, and incorporates a
1.3-megapixel digital camera. Eventually, Intel plans to further reduce the size
of the individual components by integrating more features into fewer chips.
Instead of separate radios for each service, software will be able to tune a
single device to whatever frequency is needed.

Intel would have silicon for the expanded wireless network such as WiMax by
the end of the year. Basestations and customer premises equipment are expected
to be available by the middle of 2005. WiMax capability would be built into
notebook computers by 2006, followed by handsets by 2007. The huge bandwidth
increase provided by WiMax, compared to Wi-Fi, over much greater distances could
set up a battle with operators of 3G networks. It will be a requirement that
Wi-Fi, WiMax and 3G co-exist.