Intel is reportedly ordering and installing its first chip-equipment for the 65-nm node, in a massive procurement effort initially worth about $ 500-to-$ 700 million. Intel is racing against other chip makers to deploy its 65-nm technology, which is slated to move into production in 2005–if not earlier. Intel disclosed the details of its 65-nm process, which is an 8-metal layer technology that deploys copper, low-k dielectrics, strained-silicon, and alternating phase-shift photomasks. It also disclosed that its DID 300-mm development fab in Oregon will become the initial high-volume plant for both its 65- and 45-nm process technologies. Intel has been running “development equipment” within D1D for 65-nm processing. Intel also plans to convert its Fab 12 plant, a 200-mm wafer fab in Chandler, Arizona, to a 300-mm facility. The conversion is not slated to begin until the first half of 2004, and 300-mm production is not scheduled to begin until late 2005. The converted fab, to process 65-nm wafers, is estimated to cost $ 2 billion. Tool orders and installation for Fab 12 are expected to begin at the end of the third quarter of this year.

Intel is reportedly ordering and installing its first chip-equipment for the 65-nm node, in a massive procurement effort initially worth about $ 500-to-$ 700 million. Intel is racing against other chip makers to deploy its 65-nm technology, which is slated to move into production in 2005–if not earlier. Intel disclosed the details of its 65-nm process, which is an 8-metal layer technology that deploys copper, low-k dielectrics, strained-silicon, and alternating phase-shift photomasks. It also disclosed that its DID 300-mm development fab in Oregon will become the initial high-volume plant for both its 65- and 45-nm process technologies. Intel has been running “development equipment” within D1D for 65-nm processing. Intel also plans to convert its Fab 12 plant, a 200-mm wafer fab in Chandler, Arizona, to a 300-mm facility. The conversion is not slated to begin until the first half of 2004, and 300-mm production is not scheduled to begin until late 2005. The converted fab, to process 65-nm wafers, is estimated to cost $ 2 billion. Tool orders and installation for Fab 12 are expected to begin at the end of the third quarter of this year.