xeon Intel reaches supercomputing milestone with Xeon E5 processors

Intel is taking the supercomputing world by storm with its Xeon E5 processors, which broke a record for the fastest new processing technology to be adopted by supercomputers.

Intel is taking the supercomputing world by storm with its Xeon E5 processors, which broke a record for the fastest new processing technology to be adopted by supercomputers.

 
The milestone is recorded in the 39th edition of the Top500 supercomputers in the world, with 77 percent of newly-entered monster machines powered by Intel processors. Even when including older entries Intel rules a whopping 74 percent of the top 500, with 372 Intel-powered systems on the list.
 
Intel stopped shy of the first three spots, which run on Power BQC and SPARC64 processors, but the fourth, fifth, ninth and tenth on the list are all powered by Xeon.
 
Intel's highest entry at fourth place is the SuperMUC supercomputer at LRZ in Germany, delivering 2.9 petaFLOPs of performance, which makes it the most powerful computer in Europe and the largest installation based on Intel's Xeon range.
 
intelxeon Intel reaches supercomputing milestone with Xeon E5 processors
 
Intel plans to deliver high computing performance beyond the supercomputer market with the new Xeon Phi range, due later this year, which will eventually cater for enterprise datacentres and workstations as well as supercomputing. Cray will be one of the first supercomputer firms to embrace the technology.
 
“We are very excited to announce that our next-generation supercomputer code-named ‘Cascade’ will be available with the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors, giving Cray customers the ability to push the limits of research and discovery,” said Peg Williams, SVP of high performance computing systems at Cray. “Our Cascade system will feature some of the most advanced and highly innovative HPC technologies ever put into a Cray supercomputer. Combining these features with industry-leading Intel Xeon processors and the new Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors will result in a very compelling system for HPC centers around the world.”
 
Intel is aiming to reach exascale-level computation by 2018, which is the next stage up from the current petascale and will revolutionise the processing speed of supercomputers around the world. The company considers its Xeon range a pivotal part of this advancement and is investing heavily in developing new architecture and fabric in order to achieve its goal.