Intel logo Intel researching computers that mimic human brain

Intel is researching computer technology that mimics the human brain so that it learns about the user over time, marking a major milestone in artificial intelligence and next-generation computing.

Intel is researching computer technology that mimics the human brain so that it learns about the user over time, marking a major milestone in artificial intelligence and next-generation computing.

 
The research will begin at the Intel Collaborative Research Institute for Computational Intelligence in Israel, with additional aid from specialists of Technion and the Hebrew University.
 
"Machine learning is such a huge opportunity," said Justin Rattner, CTO of Intel, according to Reuters. "Despite their name, smartphones are rather dumb devices. My smartphone doesn't know anything more about me than when I got it. All of these devices will come to know us as individuals, will very much tailor themselves to us."
 
The plan is to develop small, wearable computers that improve certain aspects of everyday life. An example given was a user leaving his or her car keys at home. The first week the device will remember where he or she left the keys, while in the second week it will remind him or her not to forget the keys. This ability to adapt to a user's experience could revolutionise the industry and produce huge demand for new home equipment.
 
intel reimagine tech research collection overview module 720x470 Intel researching computers that mimic human brain
 
"Within five years all of the human senses will be in computers and in 10 years we will have more transistors in one chip than neurons in the human brain," said Moody Eden, president of Intel Israel.
 
The question, of course, is whether or not this will lead to technology outsmarting us and the scenarios put forward by science-fiction writers of robots revolting against our rule. It might all sound far-fetched, but so did the idea of computers that learn a few years ago.
 
Intel expects the first of these devices to be ready by 2014 or 2015.
 
Source: Reuters
Image Credit: Intel