NAPA’S LIFE as a notebook platform is assured until the second quarter of 2007, Intel told its partners last week. But when super duper Santa Rosa dawns in the second quarter of next year, it will now include WWAN technology dubbed “Windigo”.

Intel’s “Merom” notebook chips which somewhat confusingly will also be called Core 2 Duo like the Conroe chips, will use the Santa Rosa chipset next year but with a number of additions. Merom chips will support 64-32 iAMD extensions, while chipset Santa Rosa has had something of a makeover by the cosmetic surgeons over in Santa Clara. Business and consumer processors will support WWAN (Windigo) as well as Robson, while some SKUs (stock keeping units) will be called “Crestline” and “Nineveh”, depending on the features they’re supporting.

NAPA’S LIFE as a notebook platform is assured until the second quarter of 2007, Intel told its partners last week.

But when super duper Santa Rosa dawns in the second quarter of next year, it will now include WWAN technology dubbed “Windigo”.

Intel’s “Merom” notebook chips which somewhat confusingly will also be called Core 2 Duo like the Conroe chips, will use the Santa Rosa chipset next year but with a number of additions. Merom chips will support 64-32 iAMD extensions, while chipset Santa Rosa has had something of a makeover by the cosmetic surgeons over in Santa Clara. Business and consumer processors will support WWAN (Windigo) as well as Robson, while some SKUs (stock keeping units) will be called “Crestline” and “Nineveh”, depending on the features they’re supporting.

Core 2 Duos using, for example, the T7700 number series will use the Santa Rosa chipset , while Intel will also get round to launching Celeron Ms using a Merom core at some time in the future. These will hit the world early next year.

The full line up of Meroms, which will be manufactured on a 65 nanometre process, is extensive, from the T7700, a 2.4GHz, 800MHz, 4MB chip supporting VT, EIST, iAMD64, XD, and with socket P pinouts and FGA/BGA packaging, to three little LV and ULV babies – the L7500 (1.5GHz), the L7200 (1.33GHz) and the U7500 (1.06GHz) with 4MB, 4MB and 2MB of cache respectively.

Ninety five per cent of notebook chips will be dual core by Q4, Intel is projecting. It’s all rather exciting, isn’t it? µ