Q2 2006 Q3 2006 2007
Platform Truland & OEM Caneland
Xeon MP
 Paxville MP
(90nm, Dual Core, 2 x 2MB L2)

7041 (3GHz, 800FSB)
7040 (3GHz, 667FSB)

Paxville MP
(90nm, Dual Core, 2 x 1MB L2)

7030 (2.8GHz, 800FSB)
7020 (2.66GHz, 667FSB)

Tulsa
(65nm, Dual Core, 2 x 1MB L2, 800/667FSB, 16MB L3)

7xxx


Tigerton
(65nm, Quad Core)
Platform Bensley
Xeon DP  Dempsey
(65nm, Dual Core, 1066FSB, 2 x 2MB)

5080 (3.73GHz)
5070 (3.46GHz)
5060 (3.2GHz)
5050 (3.0GHz)

Woodcrest

(65nm, Dual Core, 1333FSB, 4MB L2)

5160 (3.0GHz)
5150 (2.66GHz)
5148 (2.33GHz)
5140 (2.33GHz)
5130 (2.0GHz)


Woodcrest

(65nm, Dual Core,
1066FSB, 4MB L2)

5120 (1.86GHz)
5110 (1.6GHz)

Clovertown

(65nm, Quad Core, 4MB L2)
Platform Linderhurst
Xeon LV
Sossaman
(90nm, 2MB L2, 667FSB)

2.0GHz
1.66GHz

Dual-core, quad-core and processors with 24MB of cache; Intel is determined to take the top spot for servers…
At the Intel Developer Forum a few weeks ago, Intel got the attention of the PC community by demonstrating its next-generation CPU architecture: Core. It almost seemed as though Intel’s other products and technologies were being overshadowed by Conroe and Core, which won’t be released for several months still.





  Q2 2006 Q3 2006 2007
Platform Truland & OEM Caneland
Xeon MP
 Paxville MP
(90nm, Dual Core, 2 x 2MB L2)

7041 (3GHz, 800FSB)
7040 (3GHz, 667FSB)

Paxville MP
(90nm, Dual Core, 2 x 1MB L2)

7030 (2.8GHz, 800FSB)
7020 (2.66GHz, 667FSB)

Tulsa
(65nm, Dual Core, 2 x 1MB L2, 800/667FSB, 16MB L3)

7xxx


Tigerton
(65nm, Quad Core)
Platform Bensley
Xeon DP  Dempsey
(65nm, Dual Core, 1066FSB, 2 x 2MB)

5080 (3.73GHz)
5070 (3.46GHz)
5060 (3.2GHz)
5050 (3.0GHz)

Woodcrest

(65nm, Dual Core, 1333FSB, 4MB L2)

5160 (3.0GHz)
5150 (2.66GHz)
5148 (2.33GHz)
5140 (2.33GHz)
5130 (2.0GHz)


Woodcrest

(65nm, Dual Core,
1066FSB, 4MB L2)

5120 (1.86GHz)
5110 (1.6GHz)

Clovertown

(65nm, Quad Core, 4MB L2)
Platform Linderhurst
Xeon LV
Sossaman
(90nm, 2MB L2, 667FSB)

2.0GHz
1.66GHz

On the server-side, Intel has an equally impressive lineup. For the enterprise segment, Intel’s dual-core Itanium 2 MP is currently taking the top spot. Based on the Montecito core, the Itanium 2 9000 family brings 533MHz FSB to the table, which is less than the Itanium 2 9M, but with L3 cache options all the way up to a whopping 24MB. All Itanium 2 9000 series support Virtualization technology. The Itanium 2 9000 family is reserved for situations where clustering and mainframe environments are needed. Supporting up to 512-way configurations, Intel is hoping that Itanium 2 9000 will keep it leading in the high-end enterprise market.

For entry level and mid-range configurations, Intel is letting its dual-core Xeon family drive the market through into 2007. Running at 800MHz FSB, current Xeon processors are based on the Paxville core, which supports 4-way and 8-way system configurations. In Q4’06, Intel will be introducing Xeon processors based on the Tulsa core. The new core will support the same configurations as Paxville but offer 16MB L3 cache options.

The Xeon MP 7000 series, Paxville based CPUs, will be also coexist with the new Xeon 5000 family, which is based on the Dempsey core. Dempsey focuses more on power usage, especially that now a lot of companies are talking about performance-per-watt. Xeon processors based on Bensley platform (Xeon 5000) will be introduced in Q3’06, with support for 1333MHz FSB and will be stacked under the Xeon 5000 family. The push to the 1333MHz FSB will also coincide with platform adoption of FB-DIMM and Core.

Click on the source link for more details on these CPUs and pricing information.