Intel plans to demonstrate a 64-bit revamp of its Xeon and
Pentium processors in mid-February. The demo, which follows the AMD64 approach
of Intel foe Advanced Micro Devices, is expected at the Intel developer
conference, Feb. 17 through 19 in San Francisco. Intel had code-named the
technology Yamhill but now calls it CT. Adding 64-bit features would let "x86"
chips such as Intel’s Xeon and Pentium overcome today’s 4GB memory limit but
would undermine the hope that Intel’s current 64-bit chip, Itanium, will ever
ship in large quantities.

An Intel CT demonstration doesn’t mean that the technology is
ready for mainstream use, however. Analysts believe that CT was built into an
upcoming Pentium 4 version called Prescott, due Feb. 2. That means that CT would
also be in Prescott’s Xeon derivatives–"Nocona" for dual-processor systems and
"Potomac" for those with four or more processors. Analyst believes that Intel
will wait for the appearance of Prescott’s successor, called Tejas, which is due
in early 2005 because Prescott designs were complete before Intel had access to
AMD’s approach, meaning that software tuned for one wouldn’t work on the other.

Intel plans to demonstrate a 64-bit revamp of its Xeon and
Pentium processors in mid-February. The demo, which follows the AMD64 approach
of Intel foe Advanced Micro Devices, is expected at the Intel developer
conference, Feb. 17 through 19 in San Francisco. Intel had code-named the
technology Yamhill but now calls it CT. Adding 64-bit features would let "x86"
chips such as Intel’s Xeon and Pentium overcome today’s 4GB memory limit but
would undermine the hope that Intel’s current 64-bit chip, Itanium, will ever
ship in large quantities.

An Intel CT demonstration doesn’t mean that the technology is
ready for mainstream use, however. Analysts believe that CT was built into an
upcoming Pentium 4 version called Prescott, due Feb. 2. That means that CT would
also be in Prescott’s Xeon derivatives–"Nocona" for dual-processor systems and
"Potomac" for those with four or more processors. Analyst believes that Intel
will wait for the appearance of Prescott’s successor, called Tejas, which is due
in early 2005 because Prescott designs were complete before Intel had access to
AMD’s approach, meaning that software tuned for one wouldn’t work on the other.