Intel will publicly demonstrate Intel’s first dual-core processor as part of a keynote at the Intel Developer Forum. The most significant is likely to be the company’s first multicore microprocessor, a server chip Intel declined to name. Intel will describe some of the applications likely to get the most benefit from multicore CPUs, and lay out a road map for when such chips will begin to emerge in servers, PCs and other products. Intel will ship Montecito, a dual-core Itanium chip in mid-2005, making it the lead candidate for Otellini’s demo. Intel will also discussed plans for a dual-core X86 Xeon, but said it may not ship that part, called Tulsa, until 2006. Intel will outline more details of LaGrande security technology, Silvervale and Vanderpool processor virtualization and partitioning technology, as well as the EM64T.

Intel will publicly demonstrate Intel’s first dual-core processor as part of a keynote at the Intel Developer Forum. The most significant is likely to be the company’s first multicore microprocessor, a server chip Intel declined to name. Intel will describe some of the applications likely to get the most benefit from multicore CPUs, and lay out a road map for when such chips will begin to emerge in servers, PCs and other products. Intel will ship Montecito, a dual-core Itanium chip in mid-2005, making it the lead candidate for Otellini’s demo. Intel will also discussed plans for a dual-core X86 Xeon, but said it may not ship that part, called Tulsa, until 2006. Intel will outline more details of LaGrande security technology, Silvervale and Vanderpool processor virtualization and partitioning technology, as well as the EM64T.