Emphasis on small form factor computing shows Intel is pushing to diversify its product lines.

DSC 3227 1024x681 Intel updates Next Unit Computing line with Atom based unit

Intel updated its Next Unit Computing line last week, aimed at applications like thin client, digital signage, point-of-sale, with a model powered by Intel’s Bay TrailAtom E3815 processor.

While the PC market itself isn’t dying, interest is fading in large and bulky desktop units. Intel knows this and that’s why it’s pushing out devices like All in One desktops and NUCs (a fancy word for thin client PCs) units. Intel is pushing NUCs to customers for traditional PC purposes, but is also trying to enter a number of spaces that have been traditionally dominated by ARM and MIPS.

“With its vertical industrial design and support for Linux and Windows Embedded operating systems, this Intel NUC was designed as the essential building block to power the thin-client market,” Intel said.

DSC 3885 1024x681 Intel updates Next Unit Computing line with Atom based unit

NUC intel Intel updates Next Unit Computing line with Atom based unit

This new addition to the NUC line previously went by the name “Thin Canyon,” but for whatever reason Intel has since changed this to the unwieldy DE3815TYKHE. It doesn’t require a fan, comes with 4GB of on-board eMMC memory and a small 4×4 inch motherboard. For connectivity it comes with standard Ethernet, USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 ports as well as support for more exotic connectors like inter-integrated circuit serial ports that one might need to control connected devices in a commercial environment.

Intel is selling these NUCs as a white label kit, allowing partners to rebrand them as they please or integrate them into larger commercial applications.

Pricing begins at $129 for the Intel NUC kit, or $99 for just for the NUC board.