Intel is sampling its WiMAX chip to “strategic partners” in preparation for a wide-scale rollout in 2005. WiMAX, based on the IEEE 802.16 broadband wireless standard, will allow long-range, high-speed wireless Internet access, serving both dense metropolitan areas and rural or suburban communities. The chip, codenamed Rosedale, represents the first part of a three-phase rollout. Based on the 802.16d version of WiMAX, the chip will be deployed via outdoor antennas that target known, fixed subscribers. After that, probably in 2006, Intel envisions WiMAX chips (802.16e) in notebook PCs. In 2007, they would start to appear in handsets.

Intel is sampling its WiMAX chip to “strategic partners” in preparation for a wide-scale rollout in 2005. WiMAX, based on the IEEE 802.16 broadband wireless standard, will allow long-range, high-speed wireless Internet access, serving both dense metropolitan areas and rural or suburban communities. The chip, codenamed Rosedale, represents the first part of a three-phase rollout. Based on the 802.16d version of WiMAX, the chip will be deployed via outdoor antennas that target known, fixed subscribers. After that, probably in 2006, Intel envisions WiMAX chips (802.16e) in notebook PCs. In 2007, they would start to appear in handsets.