intel rst smr Intels Smart Response, Smart Connect and Rapid Start requirements detailed

With the introduction of its new 7-series chipsets – specifically the Z77 and H77 as well as a few mobile variants – Intel will be adding two new technologies in addition to Smart Response. These two new additions will be known as Rapid Start and Smart Connect and the requirements have now been detailed courtesy of Asus' manuals for its upcoming motherboards based on the new chipsets.

With the introduction of its new 7-series chipsets – specifically the Z77 and H77 as well as a few mobile variants – Intel will be adding two new technologies in addition to Smart Response. These two new additions will be known as Rapid Start and Smart Connect and the requirements have now been detailed courtesy of Asus' manuals for its upcoming motherboards based on the new chipsets.

As previously, Intel's Smart Response will require a minim of 20GB of SSD space and nothing has really changed from the Z68 chipset here. However, in addition to the 20GB of space needed for Smart Response, Rapid Start will consume an equivalent amount of SSD space to that of how much RAM you have installed in the system. Asus is listing 2, 4 and 8GB, but we'd presume if your system has 16GB of RAM, you'll need 16GB of spare SSD space.

intel rst smr Intels Smart Response, Smart Connect and Rapid Start requirements detailed

What makes Rapid Start somewhat more frustrating to use is that it requires a separate partition from the one used for Smart Response, so in other words, if you want to take advantage of both technologies, you need to chunk up your SSD into smaller partitions. We're not entirely sure if this will be automated or not, but it's something we'll make sure to have a look at in more detail shortly. Asus is also warning that if you're using a 32-bit Windows system with more than 4GB of RAM, Rapid Start might run into some issues.

As for Smart Connect, well, it doesn't appear to use up any additional space, as it seems like it's happy to share space with Smart Response on the same partition. Smart Connect is more likely to be found on notebooks, as it's a technology that requires an Intel Wi-Fi card or NIC as far as we're aware, as it allows a computer in sleep or hibernation mode to wake up and download updates for Windows, keep your emails up to date (do people still use offline mail clients?) and even refresh web pages and other internet connected programs. It'll be interesting to see how well this works in praxis, but we have a feeling Intel has put some effort into making it work as seamless as possible.