Quite often Intel is the best source when it comes to its own product leaks and this time around its upcoming Valley View Atom SoC has leaked thanks to in part to the fact that Intel has had to submit graphics driver information in time for the upcoming Linux 3.4 kernel being set in stone. However, at the same time, details have also appeared on roadmaps from Advantech, a Taiwanese IPC maker that gives additional details as to what to expect.

Quite often Intel is the best source when it comes to its own product leaks and this time around its upcoming Valley View Atom SoC has leaked thanks to in part to the fact that Intel has had to submit graphics driver information in time for the upcoming Linux 3.4 kernel being set in stone. However, at the same time, details have also appeared on roadmaps from Advantech, a Taiwanese IPC maker that gives additional details as to what to expect.

The first details were spotted by Phoronix as they found details with regards to patches for the upcoming Linux 3.4 kernel that stated "ValleyView is a CedarView-like chip but with an Ivybridge graphics core." This in itself is very interesting, as it shows that at least on the desktop side, Intel is planning on moving away from the PowerVR graphics cores that the company has been relying on for its past couple of generations of Atom processors.

Other details unearthed by Phoronix include support for two DisplayPort interfaces (most likely eDP and a regular DisplayPort) and HDMI output, a new interrupt architecture and Turbo Boost support, albeit somehow done differently than on Ivy Bridge.

Shortly after Phoronix discoveries, The Verge managed to dig up some roadmaps from Advantech that gives us a few additional details as to what to expect. According to a few upcoming products from Advantech the Valley View Atom SoC will feature the Balboa Pier chipset – a bit of trivia here, Intel's 440LX chipset was codenamed Balboa – although as Valley View is said to be a 22nm SoC, it's very likely that the chipset will be integrated into the CPU package or the CPU itself.

The Advantech roadmap further details one to four cores, four times the graphics performance, although it doesn't really state compared to what, but we'd presume the current Cedar Trail Atom processors, support for between 4 and 8GB of DDR3 memory and interestingly enough ECC support making Valley View a much more interesting solution for the IPC and entry level server market and finally what appears to be native USB 3.0 support.

Valley View isn't expected to launch until very late this year or early next year, but it could potentially be the most interesting Atom processor to date, especially as it seems like Intel has given up on pushing its Atom processors as a castrated, low-budget alternative. Judging by the rumoured specifications, we have a feeling that Valley View won't be as cheap as the current Atom processors, but it'll likely depend a lot on what's available from the competition.

Source: Phoronix, The Verge