Kentron 2nd generation memory product is on the way with architectural
refinements that make the modules more self sustaining. QBM modules have two
double-data-rate banks, running on alternating clock schedules. It stumbled in
getting its initial QBM technology out the door, foiled by a bug in a key
component and a lack of widespread support by core logic and memory module
vendors. Now it is consolidating support logic on the memory module. The move
will also eliminate additional traces on the motherboard needed for control
signals, making the QBM modules truly able to plug and play into DDR-based
systems. Kentron has also decided to use a Jedec standard PLL instead of a
customized version.

Although QBM delivers double the data bandwidth, it still has to work with
the same address command bandwidth. That was seen as a limiting factor against
dual-channel DDR systems. Currently, Kentron designers are completing timing
interfaces among the chip set, switch and memory, as well as defining component
specs for the switch and controller logic. The new modules should be out in the
first half of 2005. The first modules will run at 800 MHz, outpacing the DDR-2
533- and 667-MHz modules. Kentron is going after the high-end PC market and also
targeting communications applications, such as routers.

Kentron 2nd generation memory product is on the way with architectural
refinements that make the modules more self sustaining. QBM modules have two
double-data-rate banks, running on alternating clock schedules. It stumbled in
getting its initial QBM technology out the door, foiled by a bug in a key
component and a lack of widespread support by core logic and memory module
vendors. Now it is consolidating support logic on the memory module. The move
will also eliminate additional traces on the motherboard needed for control
signals, making the QBM modules truly able to plug and play into DDR-based
systems. Kentron has also decided to use a Jedec standard PLL instead of a
customized version.

Although QBM delivers double the data bandwidth, it still has to work with
the same address command bandwidth. That was seen as a limiting factor against
dual-channel DDR systems. Currently, Kentron designers are completing timing
interfaces among the chip set, switch and memory, as well as defining component
specs for the switch and controller logic. The new modules should be out in the
first half of 2005. The first modules will run at 800 MHz, outpacing the DDR-2
533- and 667-MHz modules. Kentron is going after the high-end PC market and also
targeting communications applications, such as routers.