USB flash drives are the greatest threat to information security ever, but Kingston has a partial solution.

kingston Kingston ships USB drive that automatically encrypts contents

Though a network’s engineers may be extraordinarily diligent in keeping hackers out, time and time again there have been cases of enterprise and military networks being penetrated by not a sophisticated attack using zero-day exploits but rather by something as simple as a USB drive.

USB flash drives have become the bane of network security personnel the world over. Sometimes employees insert their personal drives into a work computer on a secure network, potentially allowing trojans onto the network to collect sensitive data and transmit it back to home base once the employee plugs the drive back into their home computer. In some cases, USB drives containing confidential company materials are lost creating the risk of anything from identity theft to corporate espionage.

Kingston has come up with a solution: a USB drive that automatically encrypts the contents. Kingston’s DataTraveler Vault Privacy 3.0 (DTVP 3.0) thumbdrive offers hardware encryption, a built in anti-virus engine, and the ability for administrators to set policies such as read only mode that would prevent malware from being inserted on the device.

Using encrypted USB drives is a step in the right direction, but not a cure all. A cunning attacker could simply make a replica of one of these drives and leave it somewhere where an employee of the target organization may find it, with the person plugging it into a computer on the network because to them it looks like a company issue secure USB drive. Aside from an outright ban of USB thumb drives in an enterprise environment, using encrypted drives is the best thing that can be done.

The DTVP 3.0 is available in 4GB, 8GB, 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB versions. Prices range from $40 to $355.