Kingston SSDNow V Series 64GB Review

In terms of looks, the Kingston SSDNow V is not much different from its competitors in the market: it is made to fit into a notebook’s 2.5-inch bracket, and since it contains zero moving parts, you get a storage device that is much lighter than a standard HDD, which might be useful in helping to shave off a few grams from your notebook’s overall weight.

 Kingston SSDNow V Series 64GB Review

As Elledan pointed out in his previous review with the Kingston SSDNow V+ SSD, the V series also comes with a textured finish, which leads us to think that this may be a common feature on all of Kingston’s SSDs.

 Kingston SSDNow V Series 64GB Review

 Kingston SSDNow V Series 64GB Review

Like the V+, the SSDNow V is held together by four torx screws, which means that without the proper screwdrivers, getting into the device is not going to be easy. Fortunately, we had the means of doing so, and popping open the casing reveals…surprise surprise, a whole bunch of Toshiba. Oh, and there’s a Winbond cache chip somewhere there as well.

Making up the SSDNow V’s storage are sixteen 4GB flash chips: eight on top, and eight more below. The controller, on the other hand, isn’t too impressive: after some research, we found that the elusive Toshiba TC58NCF618CBT controller (not visible in the image) found in the device is actually a rebranded JMicron JMF618 chip.

 Kingston SSDNow V Series 64GB Review

The SSD also comes bundled with a SATA-USB cradle for those who might decide to use the device for external storage instead of cracking open their notebooks to install the SSD internally. As we have hoped, the enclosure is padded and the device fits nicely into the allocated space.

As this review is centered on gauging the performance increase one could expect in a computer when using an SSD, we chose not to benchmark the SSDNow V on a powerful rig, opting instead to do the test in a notebook computer, where the SSD’s performance will be compared against the traditional hard disk that is bundled in such devices. For this test, we used the Lenovo Thinkpad SL410 that was reviewed some time earlier, with its specs as such:

 Processor Intel Core 2 Duo T6670 (2.20GHz, FSB: 800MHz, Cache: 2MB)
 Operating System Genuine Microsoft Windows 7 Professional (32-bit)
 Graphics Onboard Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 4500MHD
 Memory 3GB PC3-8500 DDR3 SDRAM 1066MHz
 Display 14.0″ HD VibrantView 1366 x 768
 Hard disk capacity 250GB, 5400rpm
 Network card Intel Wireless Wi-Fi Link 5100
 Optical drive DVD-recordable (dual layer)
 Bluetooth Bluetooth version 2.1 + EDR
 Pointing device ThinkPad UltraNav (trackpad and pointing stick)
 Fingerprint reader-none-
 Battery 6-cell Li-on