In what may come as a bit of a surprise, the legendary “Pentium” brand name fights on with great strength. Whilst Intel continues tick-tocking Core branded next-gen products, the few Pentium Dual-Core CPUs will account for 42-43% of Intel’s total desktop CPU volume. In fact, Core 2 based Pentium E5000 and E6000 CPUs will take up as much as 40% of Intel’s total desktop market.

It should not come as a major surprise though, as after all, a majority of the world’s population is only interested in internet, light office suite work and the occasional video.

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In what may come as a bit of a surprise, the legendary “Pentium” brand
name fights on with great strength. Whilst Intel continues tick-tocking
Core branded next-gen products, the few Pentium Dual-Core CPUs will
account for 42-43% of Intel’s total desktop CPU volume. In fact, Core 2
based Pentium E5000 and E6000 CPUs will take up as much as 40% of
Intel’s total desktop market.

It should not come as a major
surprise though, as after all, a majority of the world’s population is
only interested in internet, light office suite work and the occasional
video.

Pentium remains the most recognized brand name to any casual PC user – especially in developing markets, which must be the main source of Pentium sales.

The latest addition to the Pentium brand is the G6950, based on the Clarkdales that power Core i3 and i5, priced at $87.

While Intel reigns supreme in the performance and high end market, AMD still offers the best value at the entry level, where the Pentiums battle. Thanks to Intel’s distribution network and marketing prowess, it still does not stop Pentiums.

It is one of those curious facts in hardware marketing. Though the report suggests the era of Pentiums are coming to an end, with Core taking over, there’s a feeling that Intel will hang on to the Pentium brand name for a while at the entry level.

Reference: Xbitlabs