Badmac Mac OS X is really vulnerable, says Kaspersky

Following an investigation into the security and vulnerability of Mac OS, Kaspersky's CTO Nikolay Grebennikov explained that "Mac OS is really vulnerable."

Following an investigation into the security and vulnerability of Mac OS, Kaspersky's CTO Nikolay Grebennikov explained that "Mac OS is really vulnerable."

Badmac Mac OS X is really vulnerable, says Kaspersky

"Our first investigations show Apple doesn't pay enough attention to security. For example, Oracle closed a vulnerability in Java, which was a target for a major botnet several months ago." Grebennikov told Computing News.

However, Computing News also erroneously implied that Apple had actually reached out to Kaspersky labs for a security analysis of Mac OS. However, Kaspersky later explained that this news was based on information taken out of context.

Instead, the Russian security company independently performed the analysis of Mac OS, revealing that the software has not been taking security much too seriously. "As Mac OS X market share continues to increase, we expect cyber-criminals to continue to develop new types of malware and attack methods. In order to meet these new threats, Kaspersky Lab has been conducting an in-depth analysis of Mac OS X vulnerabilities and new forms of malware." said Grebennikov in a statement. "This security analysis of Mac OS X was conducted independently of Apple; however, Apple is open to collaborating with us regarding new Mac OS X vulnerabilities and malware that we identify during our analysis."

This news follows the recent outbreak of the now infamous 'Flashback', a Macintosh trojan horse. This trojan was able to infect hundreds of thousands of Mac computers, thanks to a vulnerability in Java. This vulnerability has now been patched, but it began a concern for whether Macintosh computers are truly secure.

In the past, Macs have been the go-to computers for security, due to their lack of viruses, malware and trojans. But many researchers argue that this has been largely due to Macs’ previously lower market share, rather than a particularly difficult-to-breach operating system.

"Market share brings attacker motivation," said Kaspersky in April. "Expect more drive-by downloads, more Mac OS X mass-malware. Expect cross-platform exploit kits with Mac-specific exploits."