Majority of Americans confused by the cloud

A majority of Americans are confused about what the cloud is and many of them fake knowledge about it when asked, revealing a worrying lack of education about one of the booming sectors of the technology industry.

A majority of Americans are confused about what the cloud is and many of them fake knowledge about it when asked, revealing a worrying lack of education about one of the booming sectors of the technology industry.

 
A survey of 1,000 American adults conducted by Wakefield Research for Citrix this month shows that a cloud of unknowing hangs above the heads of many, with 56 percent admitting that they haven't a clue about what cloud computing is when they hear about it in conversation.
 
Despite this confusion, 22 percent of those asked pretend to know what itis, with a third feigning knowledge of the cloud at work and 14 percent faking it in job interviews. Even 17 percent pretended to understand the cloud on a first date, perhaps hoping to impress with their technical expertise.
 
However, a number of those queried linked the cloud with weather, pillows, drugs, heaven, toilet paper, and emotions like joy and sadness, while others believed the greatest advantage of the cloud is working at home with no clothes on. 29 percent linked the cloud with weather, while only 16 percent thought of it as a computer network for storing, accessing and sharing data.
 
 Majority of Americans confused by the cloud
 
54 percent claim that they don't use the cloud, whereas in reality 95 percent of them do use it, with 65 percent via online banking, 63 percent via online shopping, 58 percent via social networks, 45 percent via online games, 29 percent via online photo storage, 22 via online music or video storage, and 19 percent via file-sharing networks, all of which are based on the cloud.
 
While not knowing much about the cloud, those asked did recognise its usefulness, with 68 percent believing it has economic benefits. 35 percent see the cloud lowering costs, 35 percent see it boosting business engagement, and 32 percent see it helping small business growth. 59 percent believe that the workplace of the future will exist entirely in the cloud.
 
However, some are wary about using the cloud, with 34 percent disliking the cost, 32 percent leery of security issues, and 31 percent concerned about privacy. Those asked are evenly divided on whether or not stormy weather can interfere with the cloud, with 51 percent saying it does.
 
“This survey clearly shows that the cloud phenomenon is taking root in our mainstream culture, yet there is still a wide gap between the perceptions and realities of cloud computing,” said Kim DeCarlis, vP of corporate marketing at Citrix. “While significant market changes like this take time, the transition from the PC era to the cloud era is happening at a remarkable pace. The most important takeaway from this survey is that the cloud is viewed favorably by the majority of Americans, and when people learn more about the cloud they understand it can vastly improve the balance between their work and personal lives.”
 
Image Credit: Michael Jastremski