Cropped Hurricane Massive Saturn hurricane helps scientists understand weather phenomenon on Earth

Mother Nature has done her work here on Earth, but elsewhere in the universe she is also hard at work putting things together and then tearing them apart.  A recent clear hurricane sighting on Saturn just proves that no matter how technologically sound we think we are, there’s no escaping the forces that are beyond our control.

The hurricane on Saturn had an eye that was 1,250 miles across (20x bigger than the average Earth hurricanes), and was swirling at around 330 mph. Also, unlike the hurricanes here on Earth, the one on Saturn did not move, and stayed put at the north pole region.

It is amazing that many of us here on Earth have yet to experience some of the stronger forces out there, but our pursuit of knowledge will drive us to mine and discover everyone nooks and cranny possible.  Analysis of weather phenomenon beyond our own sphere will provide scientists with more insights as to how the universe operate, and where human can explore and colonize down the line. 

“We did a double take when we save this vortex because it looks so much like a hurricane on Earth,” said Andrew Ingersoll, a team member at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.  “But there it is at Saturn, on a much larger scale, and it is somehow getting by on small amounts of water vapor in Saturn’s hydrogen atmosphere.”

Inventions and innovations by people throughout history have helped launch man’s mission to explore space, but even so time and luck are still the controlling factors for many of the discoveries we’ve stumbled on. It took the Cassini observer about five years just to get a good glimpse at the Saturn hurricane which had been spinning for several years now.  The advent of the equinox in August 2009 along with the correct orbit position helped scientists to catch a clear picture of the vortex.

The main goal for scientists, though, is to learn how atmospheric phenomenon on other planet can be sustained without or with little presence of water.  Added insights from the hurricane on Saturn will help scientists here on Earth understand more about how hurricane utilizes water vapors to form.

Source: NASA via Slashgear