DESIGN

Medal of Honor: Warfighter attempts to keep itself more grounded in the military then some of it's contemporaries do. In the past years, the Modern Warfare franchise seems to have drifted very far from modern warfare, instead becoming something more akin to what it would look like if Michael Bay directed a James Bond movie. This isn't necessarily bad, but it certainly doesn't feel like a military adventure any more, and Medal of Honor still does. It doesn't pull it off as well as the previous Medal of Honor, which was specifically about the war in Afghanistan, but this is largely due to the fact that you're doing special ops missions far from any front lines.

Another reason why it doesn't quite feel as military like as MoH did in 2010, is that it doesn't follow a single cohesive conflict, like it's predecessor did. It's a globetrotter, just like Modern Warfare. However, it is in this aspect that the game again sets itself apart. With the exception of a few missions, you'll often see the text "Inspired by actual events" at the beginning of a mission. Medal of Honor has indeed recreated real events, though they've been wrapped up in the fictional storyline. An upcoming DLC pack will even let you take part in the hunt for Bin Laden. These missions don't feel radically different in terms of how they play, but it does feel a little special to play something that kinda sorta actually happened.

medal of honor warfighter pakistan car chase gameplay Medal of Honor: Warfighter PC Game Review

One of the awesome driving missions. Fruit cart!

In terms of level design, we're back to basics once more. The missions take place in a number of places around the world, and for most of the game, you'll be on foot, going through corridors with scripted events and shooting gallery after shooting gallery. You could cut this out and stick it into Call of Duty or Battlefield 3 and nobody would be able to tell the difference. I'm not going to spend a lot of time talking about it, because you know exactly what it's all about. Go from cover to cover, shoot baddies, go forward, take new cover.

A few of the levels however, are radically different, as they involve driving. These missions are absolutely great, and very unique. The first thing you'll notice is that these sections aren't done in the same application as the rest of the game. Your screen will flash as the computer switches applications and when you return to the game, you'll see that you're playing in a new engine and things look a little different. In fact, there's more different here than that; these sections aren't even developed by the Medal of Honor team – they're built by the Need for Speed people. That's a very good sign right there. You can imagine that the driving doesn't feel like the stale horrible driving we usually get in shooters, and it doesn't. The cars feel smooth and dynamic and driving them is easy and fun.