creativecloud new logo Microsoft: complete shift to the cloud will take time, Adobes new model may be premature

Adobe’s shift of its creative tool to a cloud subscription-only model is turning some heads.  Microsoft, too, has deployed various cloud associated strategies, but hasn’t been too overzealous about implementing a cloud-only business model, and even the Redmond-based software giant is a bit skeptical about Adobe’s move.

In a recent Microsoft blog post titled “Software subscriptions: #progressive or #premature?”, the author, Clint Patterson, simply stated that a complete shift to the cloud “will take time.” Thus, the implication is that Adobe’s false start may be detrimental to the company’s outlook moving forward.

“Like Adobe, we think subscription software-as-a-service is the future. The benefits to consumers are huge. Subscribers are always up-to-date. They get the latest and most complete applications.  They can use subscriptions across the multitude of devices people use today. Web services like SkyDrive and applications like Skype are also more easily integrated with subscription services, like the new Office 365 Home Premium.

However, unlike Adobe, we think people's shift from packaged software to subscription services will take time. Within a decade, we think everyone will choose to subscribe because the benefits are undeniable. In the meantime, we are committed to offering choice–premier software sold as a package and powerful services sold as a subscription.” –Microsoft Office Blog

Developer tools from Adobe are undoubtedly the most widely used in all segments of the web development and artistic industry, but many users still prefer standalone installs even if they’re not the most updated or feature-packed. 

Software companies in the same space as Adobe will keep an eye on how Adobe’s new strategy will pan out.  Should the cloud subscription-only model work out for Adobe, expect others to follow.  However, there are those that want to see Adobe’s ‘premature’ leap into the cloud land the company on a hard pavement.  Microsoft thinks a complete shift will occur within a decade, but Adobe wants it to happen now.  What do you think?