63378532 handsensor Microsoft develops prototype of Digits hand sensor

Microsoft has developed a wrist-worn sensor that maps the movements of the user's hands, paving the way for a possibly more sophisticated form of motion control gaming, but might also be used for other everyday activities like changing TV channels.

Microsoft has developed a wrist-worn sensor that maps the movements of the user's hands, paving the way for a possibly more sophisticated form of motion control gaming, but might also be used for other everyday activities like changing TV channels.

 
The Redmond, Washington-based firm created the Digits sensor at its computer science lab at the University of Cambridge, along with help from scientists at Newcastle University and University of Crete.
 
The technology works by mounting camera-based sensors on the wrist, which detect infrared light, invisible to the human eye, that is shone on the hand to determine the position, and therefore the movement, of each finger. The result is a fully-functioning 3D model of the hand.
 
 63384426 gesture Microsoft develops prototype of Digits hand sensor
 
The beauty of the technology is that it is not limited to a specific space, such as a living-room where a camera is set up. Users can leave the room or even run down the street, according to project leader David Kim, and they can still interact with the device. Unfortunately the prototype is tethered to a PC, so the reality of this claim could not be demonstrated.
 
The device is designed to replace traditional sensor gloves and could be used in the next Xbox or as a separate gadget for controlling a TV or even operating a smartphone that is still in the user's pocket. The potential uses are varied, such as adjusting an imaginary volume dial, pressing keys on a virtual number pad, or employing various gestures to operate a tablet computer without actually using the touchscreen.
 
 63378536 pinch Microsoft develops prototype of Digits hand sensor
 
In terms of gaming, Microsoft suggested that users could make a gun gesture with their hand for playing first-person shooters. The idea sounds cool, but is more of a novelty and likely won't replace the fun of using a gun peripheral.
 
The major drawback of the device is that it needs to be worn, and the current prototype is somewhat bulky. This is likely to put off many people from using it, but that did not stop Nintendo's Wii from taking the world by storm, a fact that Microsoft might be willing to bet a lot of money on.
 
Source and Image Credit: BBC