winphone8 start1 Microsoft introduces shared Windows core with Windows Phone 8

Microsoft has unveiled Windows Phone 8 at the Windows Phone Summit in San Francisco, with the biggest feature being shared code with Windows 8, creating a potentially universal experience across desktop computers and mobile devices.

Microsoft has unveiled Windows Phone 8 at the Windows Phone Summit in San Francisco, with the biggest feature being shared code with Windows 8, creating a potentially universal experience across desktop computers and mobile devices.

 
Unlike Windows Phone 7, which was vastly different to Windows 7, both Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 will have what Microsoft is calling a “shared Windows core,” which means the kernel and graphics support, among other things, will be uniform across both operating systems, making it not only easier for developers to make cross-platform software, but end-users will find it easier to transition between the two.
 
Native code support for games, with shared drivers, will also mean that gaming on Windows Phone 8 will be much better than the previous version. Microsoft is promising "killer games" this year.
 
winphone8 sharedcore Microsoft introduces shared Windows core with Windows Phone 8
 
Of course, a major part of the equation is that Windows 8 is getting the Metro interface, with the various  tiles that we have come to know from Windows Phone 7, so a large part of the change is on the desktop OS, not the mobile OS. Regardless, the shared Windows core will have developers jumping for joy and will greatly expand the Windows Phone developer base, as it will be easy to port apps and software from Windows 8 over.
 
Windows Phone 7 failed to generate the kind of support that Apple's iOS or Google's Android has, but Windows 8 looks like a promising operating system, both for desktop computers and tablets, and bringing more of this potentially winning formula to Windows Phone 8 could give rivals a run for their money.
 
Windows Phone 8 is due out in Autumn.