Microsoft issues Critical security bulletin for Windows Bluetooth Stack vulnerability

winorb Microsoft issues Critical security bulletin for Windows Bluetooth Stack vulnerability

Is your PC running off the Windows 7 or Windows Vista operating system? If your answer to that question is a "yes", you might want to start firing up the Windows Update utility in your operating system and performing a full system update today, for Microsoft has announced that it has released four security bulletins for this month's Patch Tuesday, and that one particular bulletin which has been marked as "Critical" is designed to patch a reported flaw in the Windows Bluetooth Stack found in both Windows 7 and Windows Vista.

winorb Microsoft issues Critical security bulletin for Windows Bluetooth Stack vulnerability

Well, we are now into the second week of July, and we all know what this means for most people whose PCs are running off the world's most popular operating system. That's right, Patch Tuesday is upon us once again, and Microsoft has announced that it will making use of this period to close 22 known vulnerabilties for its software products by publishing four security bulletins, three of which are designed to patch the Windows operating system.

According to the details posted by Microsoft on its security blog, the three bulletins that will be released for the Windows operating system are centered around closing vulnerabilities found in the Windows Bluetooth Stack, its kernel-mode drivers and in the client/server run-time subsystem. Of all the three bulletins, the one related to the Bluetooth Stack has been flagged as "Critical", and it is this particular security bulletin which the Redmond giant is urging consumers and corporate users to give priority to.

 Microsoft issues Critical security bulletin for Windows Bluetooth Stack vulnerability


Of course, it goes without saying that the Bluetooth vulnerability which Microsoft is aiming to patch with its latest update will only affect users who have furnished their PCs with Bluetooth capabilities. This means that most desktop PC users could potentially ignore this particular security bulletin without the need to worry about leaving their systems open for determined attackers to gain access into, simply because most desktop PCs, be it self-assembled or purchased directly from an OEM, typically do not come with any built-in support for Bluetooth.

On the other hand, notebook users would probably do well to take heed of Microsoft's advice and patch their operating systems with the aforementioned security bulletin, considering how Bluetooth wireless connectivity is a standard feature found on virtually all mobile computers that are being sold on the market today. And yes, it only affects Windows 7 and Windows Vista, so users of Windows XP can probably heave a sigh of relief…for now.

Source: Microsoft TechNet blog, Microsoft TechNet

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