Microsoft refute a published

report
claiming the company has axed its Next Generation Secure Computing
Base (NGSCB) security technology. NGSCB—the hardware/software security system
formerly code-named "Palladium"—has been one of the most controversial
components expected to debut in Longhorn, the version of Windows that’s due out
in 2006+. Microsoft is continuing to be vague about exactly how much of its
NGSCB code will ship as part of Longhorn. Customers would not be impacted by the
technology until Microsoft delivered Version 2 of the NGSCB platform. In spite
of these facts, the plan of record continues to be to deliver Version 1 of its
NGSCB technology as part of Longhorn.

Microsoft has explained NGSCB’s inner workings this way: The two foundations
of NGSCB were designed to be the Trusted Platform Module on the hardware side,
and the Trusted Operating Root (or "nexus") on the software side. The nexus was
to be the kernel of an isolated software stack that was designed to run inside
the standard Windows environment. The nexus was slated to provide a set of APIs
that would enable sealed storage and other foundations for trusted-computing.
Only applications that were designed from the ground-up to be nexus-aware would
be able to take advantage of these features.

Microsoft refute a published

report
claiming the company has axed its Next Generation Secure Computing
Base (NGSCB) security technology. NGSCB—the hardware/software security system
formerly code-named "Palladium"—has been one of the most controversial
components expected to debut in Longhorn, the version of Windows that’s due out
in 2006+. Microsoft is continuing to be vague about exactly how much of its
NGSCB code will ship as part of Longhorn. Customers would not be impacted by the
technology until Microsoft delivered Version 2 of the NGSCB platform. In spite
of these facts, the plan of record continues to be to deliver Version 1 of its
NGSCB technology as part of Longhorn.

Microsoft has explained NGSCB’s inner workings this way: The two foundations
of NGSCB were designed to be the Trusted Platform Module on the hardware side,
and the Trusted Operating Root (or "nexus") on the software side. The nexus was
to be the kernel of an isolated software stack that was designed to run inside
the standard Windows environment. The nexus was slated to provide a set of APIs
that would enable sealed storage and other foundations for trusted-computing.
Only applications that were designed from the ground-up to be nexus-aware would
be able to take advantage of these features.