Microsoft, Nokia, Oracle and others launch EU complaint against Google Android

Microsoft, Nokia, Oracle and a consortium of other companies have filed a complaint with the European Commission alleging that Google is conducting itself in an anti-competitive manner when it comes to its mobile operating system Android.

Microsoft, Nokia, Oracle and a consortium of other companies have filed a complaint with the European Commission alleging that Google is conducting itself in an anti-competitive manner when it comes to its mobile operating system Android.

 
17 companies have joined together as part of FairSearch, including old rivals to Google like Oracle, Expedia, and TripAdvisor, who previously launched complaints and legal challenges against the search giant over its dominance in other sectors.
 
The latest issue is with Google's growing mobile platform Android, which is dominating the mobile sector, thanks largely to its open source nature and support form top mobile firms like Samsung. According to Strategy Analytics, Android ruled 70 percent of the market in 2012, while eMarketer reports that Google overshadows a whopping 96 percent of the mobile search advertising market.
 
 Microsoft, Nokia, Oracle and others launch EU complaint against Google Android
 
FairSearch claims that Google is monopolising the market by offering Android for free, but requiring a number of Google-owned apps and products to be used for a full experience, such as Maps, YouTube, or Google Play. The consortium said that this “disadvantages other providers” and described Google's distribution of Android as “predatory.”
 
However, it could be argued that rival mobile platforms equally have access to features like Maps and YouTube, and Google Play is Android's own app market, so obviously would not be present on rival operating systems, anymore than Apple's App Store or Microsoft's Windows Phone Store would.
 
“Google is using its Android mobile operating system as a ‘Trojan Horse’ to deceive partners, monopolize the mobile marketplace, and control consumer data,” said Thomas Vinje, Brussels-based counsel to the FairSearch coalition. “We are asking the Commission to move quickly and decisively to protect competition and innovation in this critical market. Failure to act will only embolden Google to repeat its desktop abuses of dominance as consumers increasingly turn to a mobile platform dominated by Google’s Android operating system.”