Microsoft Office for iPad will feature similar functionality as Office for the iPhone, with users requiring an Office 365 account for document creation.

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Satya Nadella is holding an event for the press on March 27 in San Francisco in which he is slated to discuss the details of Microsoft’s “mobile first, cloud first” strategy. According to sources in the know that spoke with The Verge, Nadella will introduce the long-awaited Microsoft Office for iPad at this event.

Under Nadella, there has already been a lot of change as far as how Microsoft conducts business in the mobile segment. The software manufacturer has announced licencing fee discounts for manufacturers, added several new vendors to its list of Windows Phone manufacturers and is also said to be considering a free version of Windows 8.1. Titled Windows 8.1 with Bing, the OS will come with Microsoft’s software and online services like Bing Search and Office 365.

It looks like Microsoft is also keen on bringing its services to iDevices. Even through Apple is a competitor, it leads the field in the mobile segment in the U.S. As such, it makes sense for Microsoft to offer its services for iOS. A version of Microsoft Office for the iPhone was available since last June, and it has been revealed that the iPad variant will offer similar functionality. Users will require an Office 365 account to make changes to documents.

Late last month, Microsoft launched Office Online, a web version of Office that is now a standalone offering. Most users were unaware that Microsoft had free online-only versions of Office as these were included within SkyDrive (now OneDrive). By launching them as standalone products, Microsoft is taking the fight to Google Drive.

The March 27 event will be the first that will be helmed by Nadella. It should be interesting to see his plans to take Microsoft forward in the mobile and cloud segments. The event comes three weeks before Microsoft’s annual Build conference, where the software giant will introduce Windows 8.1.

Source: The Verge