When it rains, it pours. It was only 24 hours ago that we spotted the second-gen Microsoft Surface RT tab (likely to be called simply Surface 2) doing its benchmarking rounds with a Tegra 4 CPU inside, and we already have some scoop on its imminent Windows 8.1-powered counterpart.

Surface Pro Microsoft Surface Pro 2 expected to pack Haswell based Core i5 CPU, boost battery life and RAM

Granted, this new intel (no pun intended) comes from slightly less factual sources, namely mysterious tipsters and insiders, but since a very reputable website such as Neowin has decided to run the story, there’s no reason why we should doubt its credibility.

Based on what the site and Paul Thurrott of Winsupersite have been able to gather, the Surface Pro 2 will most definitely be powered by a fourth-generation Intel Core i5 (aka Haswell) CPU. That should boost the gizmo’s speed considerably compared with the previous tab’s Ivy Bridge SoC, but even more importantly it’ll likely bring battery life to a befitting level.

Namely, while the existent Surface Pro is merely capable of lasting five hours on a single charge, the sequel is tipped to up the ante with two more hours. And seven is a good number. Not the best, but decent nevertheless.

Microsoft Surface Pro Microsoft Surface Pro 2 expected to pack Haswell based Core i5 CPU, boost battery life and RAM

Meanwhile, other upgrades are said to include a RAM boost (to 8 gigs, though a 4 GB model might also be offered) and a more “refined” kickstand. Nobody is 100% sure exactly what that means, albeit the best guess is it’ll be sturdier and more robust.

Surprisingly (or not), Microsoft appears to think it struck gold with the first Surface Pro design-wise, as rumor has it the follow-up will be an exact copy of it. So no shaving off that 13 mm profile? Sounds like a bad idea, but what do I know?

Finally, a thick veil of mystery continues to wrap the pricing and availability details. Be that as it may, our two respectable sources estimate the Surface Pro 2 will cost about as much as the first-gen. The question is as much as it used to cost when it was first released (i.e. $900 and up) or on-par with the new pricing structure (starting at 800 bucks). Only time will tell.

Sources: Neowin, Winsupersite