Acer, Asustek and BenQ seem to be standing firm on their decisions to launch notebooks built using processors from AMD, despite growing pressure from Intel. New AMD-based products are essential to their efforts to boost sales of own-brand notebooks in the global market, particularly in Europe. Acer became the second-largest notebook brand vendor in Europe in the third and fourth quarter of last year and has a chance to become No. 1 in the first quarter of this year. The recent launch of its Aspire 1500-series notebooks made Acer the first Taiwanese vendor to use AMD’s Athlon 64 processors. Acer is also building its Aspire 1300- and 1350-series notebooks using AMD’s Athlon and Athlon XP-M processors, respectively. Asustek is likely to launch notebooks with AMD’s Athlon 64 processors in mid-April. It has already marketed its A2500D notebook, using ADM’s Athlon XP-M processors. BenQ is expected to launch its first AMD-based notebooks in the second quarter, using AMD’s 32- and 64-bit processors.

Acer, Asustek and BenQ seem to be standing firm on their decisions to launch notebooks built using processors from AMD, despite growing pressure from Intel. New AMD-based products are essential to their efforts to boost sales of own-brand notebooks in the global market, particularly in Europe. Acer became the second-largest notebook brand vendor in Europe in the third and fourth quarter of last year and has a chance to become No. 1 in the first quarter of this year. The recent launch of its Aspire 1500-series notebooks made Acer the first Taiwanese vendor to use AMD’s Athlon 64 processors. Acer is also building its Aspire 1300- and 1350-series notebooks using AMD’s Athlon and Athlon XP-M processors, respectively. Asustek is likely to launch notebooks with AMD’s Athlon 64 processors in mid-April. It has already marketed its A2500D notebook, using ADM’s Athlon XP-M processors. BenQ is expected to launch its first AMD-based notebooks in the second quarter, using AMD’s 32- and 64-bit processors.