More Sandy Bridge-E overclocking details come to light

sandy bridge ep 1 More Sandy Bridge E overclocking details come to light

Last week some details on how to overclock Intel's upcoming Sandy Bridge-E CPU were posted over at bit-tech and in as much as it covered the basics, details from a Taiwanese website that leaked almost simultaneously puts all of the puzzles pieces together. If and that's is a big if, someone can hit Intel's theoretical maximum clock speed for the upcoming Sandy Bridge-E processors, then we can expect to see CPU running at a massive 9.5GHz.


Last week some details on how to overclock Intel's upcoming Sandy Bridge-E CPU were posted over at bit-tech and in as much as it covered the basics, details from a Taiwanese website that leaked almost simultaneously puts all of the puzzles pieces together. If and that's is a big if, someone can hit Intel's theoretical maximum clock speed for the upcoming Sandy Bridge-E processors, then we can expect to see CPU running at a massive 9.5GHz.

So far only details of the turbo frequency for the Sandy Bridge-E processor have leaked, but with the help of all the additional details, we finally have a clearer picture of what to expect. It seems like Intel decided to drop at least one or two of the multipliers we heard were available on early engineering samples of the Sandy Bridge-E CPUs and as such we're stuck with 1.25 and 1.67, although just like with the current Sandy Bridge processors, the BCLK can be adjusted in increments of 1MHz.


SNB E oc More Sandy Bridge E overclocking details come to light

One slight snag is that we're stuck with the same 57x multiplier limit that we see on the current Sandy Bridge CPUs, although this does of course only apply to the 3960X and the 3930K, as the quad core 3820 is limited to a 45x multiplier. As things go, the 3820 can be overclocked six bins over its top Turbo multiplier which is 39x, although if Intel's "coarse" BCLK multipliers work as intended, it looks like speeds of a lot more than 4.5GHz can be achieved even here, with Intel hinting at speeds of between 5.9 and 7.5GHz. Not bad for a CPU which is expected to retail for US$294 in quantities of 1,000.

According to a slide from IDF posted over at bit-tech, we can expect to see core power limit overrides on Sandy Bridge-E and this explains what we heard earlier about the CPUs drawing some serious power. What we don't know is to what degree the power enveloped can be pushed, or how much it needs to be pushed, but we're sure there are plenty of eager overclockers out there waiting to find out. If some screen shots posted at bit-tech is anything to go by, we're looking at something crazy like 300W, no wonder Intel decided to create a watercooling solution for Sandy Bridge-E


SNB E oc 2 More Sandy Bridge E overclocking details come to light

At least the good news is that the PEG and DMI clocks can be locked at lower multipliers, as this will prevent PCI Express devices and the chipset to cause overclocking limitations. For those that want to run multiple graphics cards, it appears that Intel had managed to get Nvidia to agree to give the X79 chipset support for 4-way SLI without the need of any additional chips. On the not so good news front we're hearing rumblings that the 3960X might end up costing more than US$999, although we haven't been able to verify this as yet, and yes, that is without a CPU cooler still. Interestingly it looks like the 3930K might still come with a CPU cooler, but this is again something we haven't managed to verify, but according to information we've been privy to, the two CPUs are shipping in different boxes where the 3930K comes in a much larger box than the 3960X.

Source: bit-tech.net and Top PC

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