earth nasa NASA releases video explaining why world will not end on 21 December

NASA has released a video explaining why the world will not end on 21 December 2012, as many people believe.

NASA has released a video explaining why the world will not end on 21 December 2012, as many people believe.

 
The video, entitled “Why the World Didn't End Yesterday” was designed to be published on 22 December, the day after the supposed Armageddon, but the space agency is so confident that things will keep on going that it decided to release the video early.
 
The primary reason for expectations that the world will end  in a week's time is down to an ancient Mayan “long count” calendar, which covers thousands of years and mysteriously stops on the 21 December of this year, a fact that sounds ominous until one considers that it is a rolling calendar, according to Dr. John Carlson, director of the Centre for Archaeo-Astronomy.
 
earth nasa NASA releases video explaining why world will not end on 21 December
What the world will look like on 22 December 2012
 
Carlson states that the Mayan calendar is the most complex ever developed, with dates in some Mayan ruins spanning billions of years, even further back than when scientists currently postulate the Big Bang occurred. Yet there is nothing in the Mayan material that suggests the world will end next week.
 
Putting prophecies aside, NASA was able to assure people that there were no comets or asteroids on a collision course with Earth, nor was a planet coming too close either. The agency explained that such impending space objects would be visible to the naked eye if they were anywhere near the planet.
 
Fears about the Sun's flares are also deemed to be unfounded, and while the Sun is approaching the end of an 11-year cycle, which means a peak in violent eruptions, this cycle has been the tamest we have seen in 50 years.
 
For those still not convinced, NASA also has an FAQ on its website. Of course, none of that will put the conspiracy theories and doomsday predictions at rest, but we expect many scientists will be saying the words “I told you so” in just over a week's time.