NEC developed a serial interface technology capable sending and receiving digital data at 12-Gbit/s is being pushed to commercialization within less than 18 months. The I/O scheme works even when transmission includes conventional cables and printed circuit board traces between the chips and could become an essential part of high-end broadband networks and high-speed computers. NEC expects to be deploying the high-speed I/O technology, which researcher presented at the 2005 ISSCC earlier this month, on system-chips and application-specific standard products in the first half of 2006. The reason for NEC’s hard charge is because the transmission rate is three to four times faster than conventional transmission rates in current high-end servers or routers and five times faster than the PCI Express standard. NEC believes the technology could be a big differentiator of its integrated circuits from those of the competition. NEC’s technology uses a duobinary transmission technique, conventionally used for communication within hard disk drives at rates up to several hundred megabits per second. It can achieve one-and-a-half times faster — or one-and-a-half times longer — transmissions than conventional binary interface technology.

NEC developed a serial interface technology capable sending and receiving digital data at 12-Gbit/s is being pushed to commercialization within less than 18 months. The I/O scheme works even when transmission includes conventional cables and printed circuit board traces between the chips and could become an essential part of high-end broadband networks and high-speed computers. NEC expects to be deploying the high-speed I/O technology, which researcher presented at the 2005 ISSCC earlier this month, on system-chips and application-specific standard products in the first half of 2006. The reason for NEC’s hard charge is because the transmission rate is three to four times faster than conventional transmission rates in current high-end servers or routers and five times faster than the PCI Express standard. NEC believes the technology could be a big differentiator of its integrated circuits from those of the competition. NEC’s technology uses a duobinary transmission technique, conventionally used for communication within hard disk drives at rates up to several hundred megabits per second. It can achieve one-and-a-half times faster — or one-and-a-half times longer — transmissions than conventional binary interface technology.