xoom Newsflash: No Flash for Xoom + Honeycomb combination

It might not be the case down here in sunny Singapore, but in other countries, it would appear that the success of a tablet is tied to a single critical factor: support for the 'full Web content'. Which, needless to say, includes Adobe's proprietary Flash plugin used in a vast majority of websites today. However, it would seem that Motorola is about to test the validity of such a claim: after all, what other reason can there be for the former to even think about shipping an Android tablet sans the critical plugin?

xoom Newsflash: No Flash for Xoom + Honeycomb combination

So the Motorola Xoom tablet is well on its way to hitting retail shelves, and certain carriers will get first dibs on the device before the tablet is released for saleas a standalone unit and not as part of a data contract bundle. That sounds good enough for us: after all, just about all the details pertaining to the Xoom has already be revealed, so nothing else could go wrong for Motorola's and Google's flagship tablet, right?

Unfortunately for us consumers, it would seem that this is a typical case of Murphy's Law in action. Apparently, a microsite hosted by US carrier Verizon to advertise the Xoom has dropped a bombshell which is sure set tongues wagging. According to Verizon, it seems that the first batch of Xooms being sold to consumers will be offered sans support for the all-important Adobe Flash plugin, as shown in the image below.

xoom2 Newsflash: No Flash for Xoom + Honeycomb combination

Now, the lack of Flash support for Android devices is definitely not unheard of. After all, earlier versions of Android were well-known for not having support for the Flash plugin as well, and it was only with Froyo that Android users were finally able to experience the 'full web experience' often touted by Google and hardware OEMs as a key factor of its alleged superiority over iOS.

Still, it does not change the fact that the lack of Flash support is definitely not going to give Honeycomb users the 'full web content' that they can come to expect, especially after the success that was Froyo and Gingerbread. That being said, it is worth pointing out, if only for consolation's sake, that Flash will eventually make its way down to Honeycomb, as long as users do not mind waiting it out for a few more months. After all, 'eventual' Flash support is still infinitely better than opting for a platform that has 'completely zero support' for the plugin, is it not?

Source: Verizon