Anyone assuming Amazon’s Kindle Fire upgrading cycle would be disturbed by the unveil of the company’s debut Fire Phone is about to be “disappointed”, as a Fire HDX tablet sequel popped up in a benchmark listing right on schedule.

KindleFire HDX 8 9 Next gen Amazon Kindle Fire HDX tab benchmarked with Snapdragon 805 inside

The first wave of Fire Phone reviews is unlikely to please Amazon, confirming the handheld market is much trickier than the tablet PC scene. But life goes on for Jeff Bezos & co., and if fall is nearing, so is a fresh Fire OS-powered slate entry.

Dubbed simply (and confusingly) the Fire HDX, the top-notch 8.9 incher made quite the impression over at benchmarking authority AnTuTu, likely acing all the speed tests, thanks to a quad-core 2.5 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor.

The S805, paired with an Adreno 420 GPU, is the much beefier successor of the Snapdragon 800 found inside last year’s HDX. However, keep in mind the 805 is still built on 32-bit architecture, with 2015’s 808 set to usher in the 64-bit computing era to Android. Well, that, and Android L.

Kindle Fire HDX AnTuTu Next gen Amazon Kindle Fire HDX tab benchmarked with Snapdragon 805 inside

Before the Snapdragon 808 debuts, S805 is really the best Amazon could do, which is what we can also say about Android 4.4.4 KitKat, the near guaranteed inspiration behind the next Fire OS build, version 4.0.

Unfortunately, everything else about the Fire HDX 2 (“New” Fire HDX?) is the same old, same old, including 2 GB RAM, 8 MP/1 MP cameras and a 2,560 x 1,600 pix res screen, so we’re looking more at a rehash than a genuine sequel. True, Amazon left itself little to upgrade in September 2013, and in a way, 3 GB RAM or a 10+ MP rear snapper would have been a waste. Ditto for an 8.9-inch panel sporting, say, 3,200 x 2,048 pixels.

Although an AnTuTu visit isn’t exactly official confirmation of a product’s existence, we have no reason to doubt the legitimacy of the leak or the imminence of a New Amazon Kindle Fire HDX. In both 8.9 and 7-inch variations, we presume.

Source: AnTuTu