nissan steer2 Nissan to sell steer by wire cars in 2013

Nissan is to sell “steer-by-wire” cars next year, letting drivers control vehicles through the use of electronic signals, a technology used in aeroplanes, compared to older mechanical links.

Nissan is to sell “steer-by-wire” cars next year, letting drivers control vehicles through the use of electronic signals, a technology used in aeroplanes, compared to older mechanical links.

 
The Japanese car giant revealed plans to mass produce cars with the technology, a first in the industry, offering a number of advantages over the previous system, including faster transmission of driver commands to the wheels, better insulation from disturbances caused by feedback, and improved fuel efficiency.
 
The technology could face an uphill struggle, however, in terms of addressing motorist safety fears. Although the technology is used in the air, similar systems on the road have not had good publicity, such as a Mercedes-Benz “brake-by-wire” feature in 2004, which sometimes failed to transmit signals to the brakes, resulting in a recall of two million cars.
 
nissan steer1 Nissan to sell steer by wire cars in 2013
 
Nissan hopes to address these issues in the short term with a backup clutch system that resorts to a more old-fashioned technique, but it suggested that it would like to drop this safety feature in the future. If it did, it would be able to move the steering wheel to anywhere in the car, or replace it with a joystick. It even suggested a steering wheel in the back seat, which does not exactly sound like a very good place for it, but the theoretical freedom is impressive.
 
The technology could eventually be rolled out to another new approach to driving: driverless cars. Nissan already unveiled its own self-driving car at CEATEC 2012, which could respond to a smartphone, and Google has been busy getting US state approval for its driverless cars. The two technologies together could revolutionise the industry and give drivers a totally different road experience.
 
Source: BBC