pc1 Now this is we would call a real suitcase PC

Have you ever experienced a need to pack your notebook into a suitcase, only to find out that it will not fit because of the lack of real estate needed to do so? Well, leave it to the Chinese to solve the little problem in what has got to be the most novel of ways. Now this is certainly a good example of thinking within the box, no?

Busy professionals have it good when it comes to carting that all-important notebook of theirs from one place to another, right? After all, most of the aforementioned professionals tend to use small suitcases as their apparel of choice for storing various documents, and most are easily large enough to accommodate a laptop if the situation calls for it.

However, there are times where a typical suitcase might lack the real estate needed to shove a laptop into them for storage purposes, especially when most of the available space in one has already be occupied by all manner of documents and whatnot. And it would seem that this is the very kind of problem that a Chinese OEM has attempted to solve with its new, one-of-a-kind business suitcase. After all, why struggle over putting the PC into a suitcase, when one can put the suitcase right into the computer? 

It starts off a a very innocent-looking suitcase…

pc1 Now this is we would call a real suitcase PC
 

…that has a mini briefcase built into it.

pc2 Now this is we would call a real suitcase PC

pc3 Now this is we would call a real suitcase PC


Opening the 'briefcase' reveals the prize: a tablet PC built right into the briefcase, complete with a full-sized keyboard.

pc4 Now this is we would call a real suitcase PC

Amazing, is it not? Unfortunately, this is where the classic 'good news bad news' situation comes into play. Apparently, in an attempt to squeeze the PC into the confines of a tiny suitcase, the OEM was forced to make some significant compromises with the machine's performance levels. While the 'suitcase PC' will come preloaded with Windows XP to ensure maximum compatibility with the existing Windows ecosystem, the hardware used to power the device is anything but impressive.

According to a report made by Chinese IT website 1Pad.cn, the device uses a RDC3306 x86-compatible processor clocked at 1.2GHz, while the system will sport a mere 512MB of memory. As there does not appear to be any room for a dedicated hard disk, storage is accomplished by loading the device with 8GB worth of NAND flash memory chips, while the 10-inch touchscreen utilizes resistive technology and sports a rather low resolution of 1024 x 600.

Granted, the hardware specifications sound mediocre at best, but 1Pad.cn claims that the device was intended to be sold as a corporate gift for businesses. As such, it would make sense that such a computer does not need to possess the computing power found in today's PCs. Still, would you not agree that this PC would make for a rather practical gift, considering its relatively small price tag of approximately 2,000 yuan (US$305)?

Source: 1Pad.cn