Booz Allen Hamilton, which operates as the NSA’s contractor for hiring and recruiting employees for the National Security Agency (NSA), just recently revealed that the firm was apprehensive with hiring Edward Snowden because of discrepancies on his resume.

2013 06 20T222911Z 1 CBRE95J1QGU00 RTROPTP 2 USA SECURITY BOOZALLEN 300x154 NSA contractor Booz Allen admits fault with hiring practices

Newly discovered information on NSA contractor Booz Allen Hamilton’s employment practices have revealed a fresh batch of added controversy when it was found that investigators with the company had problems with Edward Snowden’s employment history, but hired him anyway.  These new and recent revelations have added more controversy to the NSA’s PRISM program that many lawmakers are calling a blatant violation of the 4th amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Booz Allen Hamilton is responsible for staffing many areas of the NSA’s intelligence gathering network, which of course includes information analysts like that of Edward Snowden.  The information these kinds of employees evaluate are said to help bring down criminal and of course help in capturing terrorists trying to cause harm to U.S. citizens at home and abroad.

Snowden’s revelations on the NSA PRISM program exposed how the NSA was storing data on millions of American Internet user’s e-mails, text messages and phone calls referred to as ‘metadata’.

generalnsa 300x168 NSA contractor Booz Allen admits fault with hiring practices

General Alexander tells Congress that the NSA’s program has thwarted dozens of potential threats in 20 countries.

The recent information coming to light paints a bad picture on how contract employees are screened out. While Snowden may have been highly skilled with his computer programming abilities, some feel that a potential spy or spies could, in theory, pass through the screening process and pass on intelligence to an enemy.

Currently the U.S. government has nearly half a million people that are employed as contract workers.

The recent testimony before the Senate subcommittee by NSA director General Keith Alexander as well as the other federal agencies, called the programs started under the Patriot Act a vital tool with thwarting worldwide terrorism

The unprecedented public inquiry by the Senate subcommittee lead by Chairman Mike Rogers, grilled the head of the NSA and wanted to know more about the details of their hiring practices through Booz Allen Hamilton.  The declassified information that the NSA head revealed to the subcommittee was somewhat limited, but it suggested that approximately 50 potential threats of major terrorist acts were stopped in more than 20 different countries all thanks in part to the PRISM program.