Nvidia Geforce GT 240 to release on November 17th

Next up from Nvidia is the GT 240, based on the GT215. This is a 40nm, DX10.1, 96 SP product. We have discussed the GT 240 before, two weeks ago. While Expreview’s benchmarks are not available any longer, we can expect the the GDDR5 version GT 240 to perform around 9600 GT levels, maybe a bit faster with driver improvements. 

However, the underwhelming GT 220 is selling at $69 for the DDR2 version and $79 for the DDR3 version, and both already losing out on all counts to the $69 HD 4670, and even Nvidia’s older 9600 GT/GSO cards. Now, we have the HD 4770 dropping in price, with bargain HD 4770s already available for ~$85. We are not sure if there is any room for this card on today’s market. Much like the recent GT 220 release, it seems a case of too little, too late, too expensive. 
More details next page. 


Next up from Nvidia is the GT 240, based on the GT215. This is a 40nm, DX10.1, 96 SP product. We have discussed the GT 240 before, two weeks ago. While Expreview’s benchmarks are not available any longer, we can expect the the GDDR5 version GT 240 to perform around 9600 GT levels, maybe a bit faster with driver improvements. 

However, the underwhelming GT 220 is selling at $69 for the DDR2 version and $79 for the DDR3 version, and both already losing out on all counts to the $69 HD 4670, and even Nvidia’s older 9600 GT/GSO cards. Now, we have the HD 4770 dropping in price, with bargain HD 4770s already available for ~$85. We are not sure if there is any room for this card on today’s market. Much like the recent GT 220 release, it seems a case of too little, too late, too expensive. 
Ideally, we should see the GT 220 dropping to $49-$59 price points, with the GT 220 coming in at $69-79. However, we are not sure we can expect such severe cuts from Nvidia, and the GT 220 may end up being priced at $89-$99. At these prices, it simply does not make sense. It loses out to the faster, cheaper HD 4770. Worse still, it will be demolished by the HD 5700 cards which are not very far away and support DX11. If this was not worrisome, the GT 200 series will almost certainly be forced out of the market once Cedar and Redwood release in January 2010. 
Of course, the GT 240 has the CUDA/PhysX advantage. Nvidia will be relying on marketing prowess, not technology, to sell these GT 220 and GT 240 cards. Like we have seen in the past – that is enough. 
Next up from Nvidia is GF100, and we sure hope they are far more interesting than the dismal GT 200 cards. 
Reference: Fudzilla
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