NVIDIA released its GF104 part, the GTX 460 largely as a measure to
regain market share than produce high profit margins. The aggressive
pricing of the GTX 460 raised the eyebrows of enthusiasts, while
consumers received exceptional value for money. Unfortunately, the
GeForce GTX 460 hasn’t been as much of a hit as expected, with supply
outstripping demand. As a result, prices for the already bargain priced
GTX 460 are dropping across the board. The GTX 460 768 MB, previously
priced at $200, can now be had for as little as $180. The GTX 460 1 GB,
has also dropped to $220.

Read on for more details…


NVIDIA released its GF104 part, the GTX 460 largely as a measure to
regain market share than produce high profit margins. The aggressive
pricing of the GTX 460 raised the eyebrows of enthusiasts, while
consumers received exceptional value for money. Unfortunately, the
GeForce GTX 460 hasn’t been as much of a hit as expected, with supply
outstripping demand. As a result, prices for the already bargain priced
GTX 460 are dropping across the board. The GTX 460 768 MB, previously
priced at $200, can now be had for as little as $180. The GTX 460 1 GB,
has also dropped to $220.

Of course, this comes as no surprise, as it was  expected and rumoured at the time of the price cuts to GTX 470 and GTX 480. Reference GeForce GTX 460 768 MB are now available between $179-$189 across a variety of AICs on Newegg and Tigerdirect, down from $199. The best deal, however, is the EVGA GTX 460 768MB Superclocked, which features an impressive 13% higher clock speed. Amazingly, this card is available for $189 at Newegg, with a mail-in rebate bringing it to $179!

The 1GB versions have been affected as well, albeit to a lesser extent. The reference GeForce GTX 460 1GB, released at $229, is now down to $219 for some AICs like Zotac, Sparkle, Palit, etc. The overclocked editions also so a general drop in price of about $10.

NVIDIA’s GTX 470 and GTX 480 continue to be priced at $300 and $450 respectively. GTX 465s are starting to disappear already, and there’s no good reason to buy one over a GTX 460, unless you find a bargain price under $200. Unfortunately, there’s no such movement on the AMD side, with the cheapest ATI Radeon HD 5830 costing $190 (HIS, Gigabyte), while most AICs continue to price at $199. HIS also sells the cheapest Radeon HD 5830, at $270.

In many ways, NVIDIA’s super aggressive pricing is reminiscent of the GTX 200 series. Released at $400, the GTX 260 quickly fell to under $300 within a week of release, as a response to ATI’s Radeon HD 4870. With a 55nm shrink and a 216 SP, the GTX 260+ was available for as little as $160 by mid-2009, despite a huge die just under 500 mm2 in size. Its competitor, Radeon HD 4870′s die, however, was just 256 mm2.

The GeForce GTX 460 was already excellent value for money, and the price drops makes it even more of a bargain. At $179, the GTX 460 is dangerously close to the much slower Radeon HD 5770. There’s also little reason to buy the Radeon HD 5830, which is slower as well as more expensive.

With the AMD Radeon HD 6000 series around the corner, we are not sure NVIDIA could afford to go to price wars with AMD at this stage. AMD already have a significant performance/die-size advantage with the HD 5000 series, and it is only going to increase further. There’s only a limit to which NVIDIA can keep dropping prices. For the consumer, it is great news for the short term, but the last thing we want is one company dominating the GPU landscape.