Answering strong criticism following the recent Geforce GT 300 series releases, Nvidia have blamed large OEM outfits as the reason for Nvidia’s much criticized rebranding policies. The Geforce GT 330, for example, is based on the G92 chip, and has been known as no less than 8800 GT, 8800 GS, 9600 GSO, 9800 GT, GTS 240, and now GT 330 with minor variations.

Nvidia argues that such products are only part of the OEM space, which isn’t particularly true. Once again, the higher end G92, 65nm 8800 GTS to 9800 GTX to 55nm 9800 GTX+ to GTS 250 are all based on much the same product – and these aren’t OEM exclusive parts either.

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Answering strong criticism following the recent Geforce GT 300 series
releases, Nvidia have blamed large OEM outfits as the reason for
Nvidia’s much criticized rebranding policies. The Geforce GT 330, for
example, is based on the G92 chip, and has been known as no less than
8800 GT, 8800 GS, 9600 GSO, 9800 GT, GTS 240, and now GT 330 with minor
variations.

Nvidia argues that such products are only part of the OEM space, which
isn’t particularly true. Once again, the higher end G92, 65nm 8800 GTS
to 9800 GTX to 55nm 9800 GTX+ to GTS 250 are all based on much the same
product – and these aren’t OEM exclusive parts either.

The simple reason for these rebrands is – they create demand without the actual effort and investment of making an actual new GPU.

Since G80 back in fall 2006, Nvidia have run through just one major new generation, i.e. GT200. In contrast, ATI have gone through R600, (let us ignore the RV6xx HD 3800 half-generation) R700 and Evergreen in the time Nvidia managed to create just a single major generation. If Nvidia would have “real” new products, there would simply be no need for rebrands.

Reference: Fudzilla