Keeping up with Nvidia’s new found tradition of frequent rebrands, Nvidia has released three new GT 300 (not to be confused with GT300) cards – the GT 320, GT 330 and GT 340.

As you may expect, GT 340 is just the same as a GT 240 – except it is only available as a GDDR5 variant. The only other difference is that the GT 340 apparently plays “flawless” Flash video, whereas the GT 240 only just “plays” Flash video. Whatever that means.

More details next page.


Keeping up with Nvidia’s new found tradition of frequent rebrands,
Nvidia has released three new GT 300 (not to be confused with GT300)
cards – the GT 320, GT 330 and GT 340.

As you may expect, GT 340 is just the same as a GT 240 – except it is
only available as a GDDR5 variant. The only other difference is that the
GT 340 apparently plays “flawless” Flash video, whereas the GT 240 only
just “plays” Flash video. Whatever that means.

A more pleasant upgrade is from a GT 220 to a GT 320. It features 72 CUDA cores compared to 48 for the GT 220. Presumably, it features a harvested GT215, as opposed to the smaller, less powerful GT216 on the GT 220. The GT216 has been moved down to Geforce 315.

An interesting product is the GT 330, which appears to feature “96-112″ CUDA cores. Given that GT215 is supposed to be a 96 shaders part, we are not sure where the extra 16 come from. It also features 256-bit in some variant (?) which isn’t part of GT215’s 128-bit interface. The 112 shaders and 256-bit point to there being a chance of some of the GT 330s being a rebrand of the GTS 240, which was a rebrand of 9800 GT, which was a shrink of the 8800 GT. Rather confusing, isn’t it? The other possibility is that GT215 was originally a 112/128 SP / 256-bit part, which had to be cut down due to TSMC’s 40nm issues.

In the end, it is yet another series of rebrands by Nvidia. Judging by Nvidia’s Q4 financial results, and a strong showing in the OEM market, rebrands work, and we have to credit Nvidia for seizing the opportunity, however farcical it may have become.

Reference: Nvidia