Abandoned by virtually every old Tegra 3 partner, including big names of the mobile industry such as Google, Asus, HTC or Sony, Nvidia has only a couple of cards left to play with the new, zippy but pricey and power-demanding Tegra 4 chips.

Tegra Tab Nvidia Tegra Tab 7 Premium gets benchmarked, scores over 27,000 points in AnTuTu

Microsoft’s follow-up to the less than stellar Surface slate is one of these cards, whereas the other one may well be a tablet built by Nvidia from the ground up. Well, not exactly, as rumor has it Shenzhen Homecare Technology will actually help the Santa Clara-based company, but the Tegra Tab 7 Premium is still likely to be stamped with Nvidia’s logo and nothing else.

Timidly mentioned in a couple of reports last week, this Tegra Tab thingy is one step closer to becoming real following an AnTuTu benchmark uncovered earlier today. As usual, we advise you to take anything relating to AnTuTu with caution, even if this particular test looks very much like the real deal.

If it is legit, the first conclusion we can draw is not all too shocking – the Tegra 4 SoC is wickedly fast, yet not as impressive as Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 800. Then again, seeing as there’s no Snapdragon 800-powered slate on the horizon, the Tegra Tab 7 Premium might have a different direct opponent: the second-gen Nexus 7, along with its aging Snapdragon S4 Pro CPU.

Tegra Tab 7 AnTuTu Nvidia Tegra Tab 7 Premium gets benchmarked, scores over 27,000 points in AnTuTu

And if we only compare the two, the future looks bright for Nvidia… for a change. With over 27,000 points, the company’s alleged future tablet crushes the 2013 N7, which is barely capable of topping 20,000 points.

Then again, it has to be said the Tegra Tab appears to sport a run-of-the-mill 1,280 x 720 pixels resolution screen, while the new Nexus 7-incher boasts a stunning IPS panel with 1,920 x 1,200 pix. A big disadvantage for the former, right?

Other rumored features of Nvidia’s 7-incher include a 5 MP rear camera, Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, microUSB, microHDMI and microSD support. All in all, that’s not so bad, but the thing needs a competitive price point like a fish needs water to survive. And I mean something along the lines of $200. Maybe even less.

Via [Tech Kiddy]