msft surface front 11374304 OEMs plan for competing with Microsofts Surface tablet

Microsoft’s entry into the PC tablet market with its Surface made many OEMs felt unsure of the future of the hardware-software ecosystem.  So how does an OEM compete with Microsoft when the software giant has decided it wants to unify software and hardware (much like what Apple)?

Microsoft’s entry into the PC tablet market with its Surface made many OEMs felt unsure of the future of the hardware-software ecosystem.  So how does an OEM compete with Microsoft when the software giant has decided it wants to unify software and hardware (much like what Apple)?

Budget OEMs like Acer seem to have a game plan to beat Microsoft’s strangled hold—at least that’s what some analysts think. 

The plan is very simple and very counterintuitive; label Microsoft’s upcoming Surface tablet as an over the top “premium” device.  If Microsoft is indeed aiming to compete with the iPad then there’s no reason why it should downgrade the quality of its device with a bargain price tag. 

Apple is dominating the tablet market outright, and it’s doing so while charging between USD $499 to $829 for the new iPad.  Microsoft’s RT tablet is supposed to be priced comparable to that of high-end Android tablets, so we figure that it’ll probably be around $500 to $600 (32GB and 64GB models), and the Surface Pro is suspected to be around $700 to $1000. 

The predicted prices for the Surface tablets aren’t cheap by any means, and that may work in the favor of bargain OEMs who has to compete with Microsoft.

Furthermore, some key players in the industry have already expressed their resentments toward Microsoft—in private and in the media.  So this may also work in the favor of competing OEMs, because the atmosphere surrounding Microsoft seems to be that the loyalty that Microsoft had for OEMs are now gone. 

If all else fails, OEMs can try bad mouthing the software giant in the press to see if it sticks.