facial expression Omron develops real time facial expression estimation technology

Omron has developed a technology that can estimate seven different facial expressions in real time, paving the way for advancements in robotics, gaming, and image search.

Omron has developed a technology that can estimate seven different facial expressions in real time, paving the way for advancements in robotics, gaming, and image search.

 
The Facial Expression Estimation technology, part of Omron's OKAO Vision collection, combines Omron's 3D model-fitting technology and statistical classification method, determining the mood of a person in a picture through the relative position of all parts of the face.
 
The process uses a very small amount of system memory and provides results in real-time, and it can work for videos as well as still images. The seven facial expressions it can recognise are happiness, surprise, fear, disgust, anger, sadness, and neutral, capturing the primary emotions of humans.
 
facial expression Omron develops real time facial expression estimation technology
 
The technology has a wide number of potential uses. A robot could be programmed to react in different ways to the facial expression it recognises from an interacting user. For example, it could be programmed to pat the user on the back and say “Everything will be okay” if it sees a sad facial expression.
 
It could be used for image search, letting users find pictures of people experiencing different emotions without needing the file name or tags to spell out what is contained in the photo. Photo decoration, which automatically adds decorative features to a picture based on the detected facial expression, is another possible application.
 
One area where this technology is likely to be taken up big-time, however, is gaming. With Nintendo revolutionising the gaming industry with its Wii motion control console, the ability to detect the user's facial expressions and adjust gameplay on the basis of that could make for more engaging experiences. We have already seen some of this in action with the addition of facial recognition to long-running MMO EverQuest II, and similar technology will likely be a feature of future gaming consoles.