IMG 1651 Palit GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream 2GB Review

The basic premise of paying more for non-reference graphics cards is for better/quieter cooling, improved hardware componentry, and hopefully higher overclocking margins. Palit's GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream achieves all of that, along with a very competitive price tag to boast about.

We've previously reviewed Palit's GTX 680 Jetstream 2GB back in April, and we found it to be an attractive choice for a high end enthusiast GPU, albeit it was in perpetual short supply. Shortly after, the launch of the cheaper GTX 670 changed the market dynamics. Although the lesser Kepler on the GTX 670 only had 87.5% of the number of SMX units than the fully-enabled GTX 680, real-world benchmarks and performance figures were much closer when both were matched matched clock-for-clock. In fact, factory overclocked cards like the one we have here today will give the GTX 680 and HD 7970/7970GHz (not GP compute scenarios though) a run for their money. After all, why pay more for intangible differences?

IMG 1651 Palit GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream 2GB Review

Palit has an ongoing promotion right now where you can win another identical card for SLI, by posting pictures of your rig in use.

IMG 1643 Palit GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream 2GB Review

 

Basic documentation/driver CD and accessories like a HDMI-DVI and DVI-Analog convertor are provided in the package.

IMG 1650 Palit GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream 2GB Review

 

Here at the I/O panel, we see the usual GTX 670/680 ports layout – full sized HDMI/DisplayPort and dual DVI (only one has dual link). In this picture, it is also clear to our viewers that the card takes up slightly more than two slots thanks to its over-sized cooler. This virtually rules out SLI on mATX setups.

IMG 1655 Palit GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream 2GB Review

 

At the back, we see that the GTX 670 Jetstream actually has a short-depth PCB like the reference model, although the power circuitry used here is different.

IMG 1656 Palit GeForce GTX 670 Jetstream 2GB Review