sleeping pills Parents drugged so teens could stay online

I can understand a little bit of teenage rebellion when it comes to trying to buck parents and their rules but I think these two teenage girls might have carried that idea just a little too far.

Having kids can be fraught with problems and more than a few headaches especially in this day and age of the Internet, texting, and kids that seem to need to be surgically separated from their electronic devices regardless of any rules or curfews that are imposed on them.

In the case of two teenage girls in Placer County, California, it seems that they weren't going to have anything to do with the rules and curfew that their parents had placed on their time spent on the Web. For the girls involved their parents had decided that 10 p.m. was a reasonable enough time to shut down access to the Internet but apparently the girls were having nothing to do with that.

So the girls decided that they would do something nice for their parents and offered to go an pick up some milkshakes for the family at a local eating establishment but when they returned home the parents noticed after slurping back a fair portion of the milkshakes that their drinks tasted strange; or as the police reported during the investigation – the drinks tasted grainy.

That didn't stop the parents from drinking enough of the milkshakes that they fell fast asleep and didn't wake up until 1 a.m. feeling rougher than a New Year's Day hangover. So wanting to find out what had happened, the parents went to their local police station where they bought a $5 drug testing kit (apparently the police have a fairly good side business selling these testing kits) and discovered that the milkshake was spiked with sleep medication.

It turns out the girls had spike the milkshakes with a pretty liberal dosage of prescription sleeping aid and when questioned by the police they said they did it because their parents' Internet policy was too harsh.

The girls have been charged with conspiracy and "willfully mingling a pharmaceutical with food".

via CNET