Brazing

Brazing is not too tough once you get the hang of it. You just need to be
careful you don’t get burnt by the intense flame. A popular gas for brazing is
MAP gas and it is relatively cheap. You just need to purchase a braze torch to
use it with a can of MAP gas. Brazing rods I’ve been using self-fluxing types
with about 20% silver content and they work well and are relatively cheap.

It is best to adjust it until the strong blue flame is at least around 8mm
above the torch tip or else the torch tip will get red hot and melt or go out of
shape.   

It is best to braze with the “cup” facing upright so that it fills up with
the filler metal to form a strong leak-free bond.

Get the blue intense flame close to the joint to be brazed as seen.

As the joint area start to get red hot, put the brazing rod up against the “cup”
joint and the rod should melt and flow like butter around the cup. Move the rod
around the whole perimeter to make sure that the whole perimeter is filled and
also move the flame around the perimeter so make sure that the filler metal
flows all around.

Do not move or touch the pipes and let it cool down for 2 minutes or so then
take away the heat with a damp cloth further away from the brazed joint like
this.

As it cools, move the cloth slowly up towards the joint. This ensures that the
joint does not crack under sudden cooling. You can wipe off the oxide with the
cloth. Damp cloths can also protect the surrounding area when brazing from
getting burnt. Just cover these areas with damp cloth. As for protecting the
pipe insulation when brazing, the flaring block of the Flaring Tool come in handy.

Just pull the insulation back from the joint as far as possible and tighten the
flaring block so that it holds it in place. Then carry on the brazing.

The flaring block also comes in handy to fix accidental kinks. Just tighten the block
over the kink to round the pipe again.