intel logo Preliminary Desktop Ivy Bridge Line up leaked

A preliminary line-up of Ivy Bridge SKUs has leaked at Chinese forums CoreSCN featuring quad-core Ivy Bridge CPUs, covering the Core i5 and Core i7 branding. As previously rumoured, the focus for Ivy Bridge is clearly power efficiency and graphics, rather than CPU performance. 

A preliminary line-up of Ivy Bridge SKUs at Chinese forums CoreSCN. The table consists of quad-core Ivy Bridge CPUs, covering the Core i5 and Core i7 branding. As previously rumoured, the focus for Ivy Bridge is clearly power efficiency and graphics, rather than performance. 

ivy 01 Preliminary Desktop Ivy Bridge Line up leaked
Table credit: Overclockers.ru

At first glance, the product segmentation is very similar to Sandy Bridge – quad-core with HT and 2MB L3 cache disabled as Core i5, the fully enabled chip as Core i7. What is notable is that the Core i5 brand has been extended to feature a greater range of clocks, and presumably a wider price range. As with Sandy Bridge, K suffix indicates unlocked multiplier, S power efficient, and T low power. The most notable change is the max TDP for all Ivy Bridge products is down to 77W, from 95W – which has been the standard for this segment for several years. 

The Core i5 brand covers Core i5 3330 to Core i5 3570K, clocking from 3 GHz to 3.4 GHz for the 77W parts. The 33xx CPUs feature limited turbo of 2 bins compared to the 34xx and 35xx brands, which feature 4 bins – like Sandy Bridge. It is worth noticing that the clock speed of the Core i5 3570K is only 100 MHz higher than Core i5 2500K. This trend is carried onto the Core i7 3770K, which tops out at 3.5 GHz – exactly the same as Core i7 2700K. It is clear that CPU performance will be essentially similar to equivalent Sandy Bridge products – albeit the performance delivered at a lower power floor, with superior graphics performance. In addition to lowering TDP across the board, Intel arguably also has to protect its high-end Sandy Bridge-E series. A 95W Ivy Bridge would clearly outrun Sandy Bridge-E in all tasks that utilize 4 cores or less. 

In line with the focus on power efficiency, Ivy Bridge also feature impressive power efficient S and T options. The S suffixed CPUs have a 65W TDP and aren't far off their standard 77W counterparts. They also offer the same turbo, which means single-threaded performance is essentially the same. The T suffixed CPUs operate under only 45W, with the top Core i7 3770T clocking up to 2.5 GHz and 3.7 GHz with turbo. Core i5 2390T, the only dual-core Core i5 part in the Sandy Bridge line-up, will be replaced by a similar dual-core Ivy Bridge CPU – Core i5 3470T, clocked at 2.9 GHz with a 35W TDP. 

These Core i5 and Core i7 Ivy Bridge products are expected to release in April 2012, with dual-core Core i3 CPUs expected later in Q2 2012. The power efficiency improvements will bring forward more significant improvements in the notebook market with configurable TDPs – particularly for ultrabooks. In the desktop arena, Sandy Bridge owners will find limited incentive to upgrade to Ivy Bridge. 

Source: Overclockers.ru